Sign up now!
Don't show this again

Thank you for confirming your subscription!

(And remember, if ever you want to change your email preferences or unsubscribe, just click on the links at the bottom of any email.)
Tap to download the app
X
Share
X

REPORTS

Collect articles and features into your own report to read later, print or share with others

Create a New Report

Favorites

Read Later

Create a new report

Report title (required) Brief description (optional)
CREATE
X
NEXT
PORK POULTRY
follow us


You must be logged in to edit your profile.

Favorites Read Later My Reports PHT Special Reports
Pig Health Today is equipped with some amazing (and free) tools for organizing and sharing content, as well as creating your own magazines and special reports. To access them, please register today.
Sponsored by Zoetis

Pig Health Today | Sponsored by Zoetis

.

Updated PRRS research book now available online

A new guide on managing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is now available online from the National Pork Board.

The 88-page booklet, PRRS Initiative Research, spans 20 years of Pork Checkoff-funded research and is said to be the most comprehensive source of available on the costly swine disease.

“Each year, the effect of PRRS is felt on pig farms across the country, and it has a $664 million annual impact on the US pork industry,” said David Pyburn, DVM, senior vice president of science and technology, NPB.

The guide has six sections including:

  • Immunology, virology and pathogenesis
  • Vaccine development
  • Epidemiology, risk factors and control strategies
  • Diagnostic testing
  • Surveillance and elimination strategies
  • Genetic resistance

 

For a free copy, click here.

 

 

Photo courtesy of the National Pork Board.


tags: ,
RELATED NEWS
  • Processing fluids helping to fine tune diagnostics in swine herds thought to be PRRS-negative

    Collecting aggregate samples of processing fluids during tail docking and castration is proving to be an excellent way to monitor herds for porcine reproductive and respiratory disease (PRRS) virus, Will Lopez, DVM, Iowa State University, told Pig Health Today.

  • Tackling PRRS: Managing outbreaks to limit damage

    According to a new guide on PRRS management, understanding how to manage the costly disease can help improve pig health and welfare, while increasing productivity.

  • Barn location can impact PRRS exposure risk

    Several factors go into selecting a site for a pork-production unit, but research shows there are a couple more — specifically, terrain and vegetation — that may influence exposure to the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

  • Early PRRS vaccination helps protect pigs through slaughter

    A new, single-dose vaccine for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has been shown to protect pigs from before weaning to slaughter, helping prevent secondary infections and performance losses associated with the costly disease.




You must be logged in to edit your profile.

Google Translate is provided on this website as a reference tool. However, Poultry Health Today and its sponsor and affiliates do not guarantee in any way the accuracy of the translated content and are not responsible for any event resulting from the use of the translation provided by Google. By choosing a language other than English from the Google Translate menu, the user agrees to withhold all liability and/or damage that may occur to the user by depending on or using the translation by Google.