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SHIC matrix weighs the impact of emerging swine diseases

As porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Seneca Valley virus surfaced within the US swine herd in recent years, it underscored the threat posed by emerging and foreign animal diseases.

While not all potential swine disease risks are reportable diseases that can close markets to US pork sales, many do pose economic risks to producers.1

In an effort to get ahead of the next threat, the Swine Health Information Center (SHIC) was initiated in 2015. The center’s mission is to protect and enhance the health of the US swine herd, according to Paul Sundberg, DVM, SHIC executive director.

“This effort is focused on monitoring global disease, targeting research dollars and analyzing swine health data, including coordinated efforts between the US and Canada,” he said.

SHIC is organized into two working groups:

  • The Monitoring and Analysis Working Group is charged with assessing foreign, transboundary production disease risks, as well as domestic disease monitoring. As a result, this group is responsible for the Swine Disease Matrix, by which they continuously update and prioritize emerging disease risks.
  • The Preparedness and Response Working Group is charged with overseeing research associated with emerging diseases. It also provides advice and oversight for the development of an emerging swine disease response plan.

At the center of SHIC’s focus is the Swine Disease Matrix — a prioritized list of endemic and foreign swine pathogens of highest risk to the US pork industry.

“The Monitoring and Analysis Working Group assessed each pathogen on three criteria and assigned a score of 1 (least) to 10 (most) risk,” Sundberg said. The criteria include:

  • The likelihood of a foreign pathogen entering the US, as well as the likelihood of an endemic pathogen changing and causing a newly emerging disease or syndrome.
  • The expected effects on production economics such as morbidity, mortality and production losses from the pathogen.
  • The probable effect on domestic and/or international markets from an outbreak due to the pathogen.

“The working group will continue to review and update the matrix as new conditions and information emerge,” Sundberg noted.

For more information or questions, email Sundberg at [email protected]. Swine disease matrix updates also can be found at the SHIC website: http://www.swinehealth.org/swine-disease-matrix/ ­

Swine Disease Matrix

Representative virus affecting swine

Economic, production impact M­­arket access, trade impacts Likelihood of US introduction or emerging domestic disease

Numerical average

Foot-and-mouth disease virus

9 9 9 9
Classical swine fever virus

9

9 5

7.7

African swine fever virus

9

9 5

7.7

Pseudorabies virus

8

8 5

7.0

Influenza A virus

4

8 8 6.7

Nipah virus

8 9 2

6.3

Ebola-Restin

8 9 2 6.3
Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus

6

4 7

5.7

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS)  virus (Chinese high path)

6

5 5

5.3

PRRS virus

6

3 6

5.0

Porcine teschovirus (Teschen/PTV1)

5

5 5

5.0

Japanese enchephalitis virus

5

5 4

4.7

Getah virus

5

5 4

4.7

Transmissible gastroenteritis virus

5

4 4

4.3

Menangle virus

4

4 4

4.0

Porcine circovirus

4

2 5

3.7

Circovirus 3

4

2 6

3.7

Porcine rotavirus

4

1 5

3.7

Swine vesicular disease virus

4

3 2

3.0

Vesicular exanthema of swine virus

3

4 2

3.0

Porcine rubulavirus

5 2 2 3.0

Seneca Valley virus

3 3 3

3.0

Porcine parvovirus

3

1 5

3.0

Porcine deltacoronavirus

3

2 3

2.7

Porcine parainfluenza 1 virus

3

2 3

2.7

Atypical swine pestivirus

3

2 3

2.7

Influenza C virus

2

2 2

2.0

Porcine respiratory coronavirus

2

2 2

2.0

Hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus

2

2 2

2.0

Encephalomyocarditis virus

3

1 2

2.0

Hepatitis E virus

1

3 1

1.7

Porcine adenovirus

2

1 2

1.7

Porcine kobuvirus

2

1 2

1.7

Porcine sapovirus

2

1 2

1.7

Orthoreovirus

2

1 1

1.3

Sendai virus

1

1 2

1.3

Porcine cytomegalovirus

2

1 1

1.3

Vesicular stomatitis virus

1

1 1

1.0

Chikungunya virus

1

1 1

1.0

Rabies virus

1

1 1

1.0

Porcine bocavirus

1

1 1

1.0

Porcine astrovirus

1

1 1

1.0

Swine pox virus

1

1 1

1.0

Porcine sapelovirus

1

1

1

1.0

Porcine torovirus

1

1

1

1.0

Swine papillomavirus

1 1 1

1.0


1
Sundberg P. Swine Information Center 2016 Progress. Proceedings of the 48th American Association of Swine Veterinarians’ Annual Meeting. 2017;331-334.Source: Swine Health Information Center

 

 


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