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Gut microorganisms linked to PRRS vaccination success

Scientists have found that tiny microorganisms in the gut may help improve outcomes for pigs vaccinated against porcine reproductive and respiratory disease virus (PRRSV) in the face of viral respiratory challenge, suggesting a role for the microbiome in vaccine response.

In a study at Kansas State University, fecal samples taken from pigs that had been given a modified-live PRRSV vaccine and challenged with PRRSV and porcine circovirus type 2 revealed that increased bacterial diversity was associated with better growth, while the relative presence of bacteria species and genera was different between the groups.

“Beneficial microbes living in the gastrointestinal tract play an essential role in the development and regulation of immunity,” said study investigator Megan Niederwerder, PhD. “We now understand that this role extends to viral respiratory vaccines in addition to viral respiratory diseases.”

The research suggests that the swine gut microbiome may affect the efficacy of PRRS vaccines, providing the basis of further work in this area that could result in complementary methods for controlling the viral disease.

“Identifying gut microbes which enhance efficacy of the currently available and widely used PRRS vaccines is a way to improve the tools we already have in our toolbox for PRRS control,” Niederwerder continued.

“Addressing complex infectious diseases requires a multimodal approach and expanding the traditional methods by which we improve swine health benefits pigs and producers.”

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Scientists have found that tiny microorganisms in the gut may help improve outcomes for pigs vaccinated against PRRSV in the face of viral respiratory challenge, suggesting a role for the microbiome in vaccine response.

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Posted on April 9, 2021

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